Best Practices

  • Privacy
    Legal Updates

    E-Discovery Strategies For Handling Personal Identifying Information

    We’re all familiar with the importance of avoiding the inadvertent disclosure of attorney-client communications, work product or sensitive, proprietary or confidential business information. However, our obligations don’t end there. In addition to protecting this information, we also need to consider how to handle personal identifying information (“PII”). With extremely large amounts of data being at play in most litigation matters, it is becoming more and more important to have a solid game plan with safeguards and protections in place. Accidentally disclosing PII can lead to a chaotic discovery process and could lead to expensive monetary sanctions.

  • Presentation
    Technology Advantage

    Presentation Skills in a Virtual World

    Let's say you have been asked to present to your firm regarding your team's accomplishments for the year. "Sure, no problem," you think, because you've done it many times. Then you find out it will be on by video. You may have gotten by during the pandemic with some group calls and the like but now you need to take your show on the virtual road. In this blog I provide tips I learned in a recent workshop on virtual presentations.

  • Attorney Client Privilege
    Legal Updates

    The Attorney Client Privilege: The Corporate Communication Conundrum – PART ONE

    “But in-house counsel was copied on the email, isn’t that enough?”

    When a business faces the prospect of producing documents in litigation, determining which documents are protected by the attorney-client privilege and preventing those documents from inadvertent disclosure is of paramount importance. Such a disclosure can have serious consequences for both the attorney’s and the client’s interests, including a court finding the privilege has been waived. At the same time, if an attorney is overly restrictive or indiscriminately withholds documents, they risk losing credibility with opposing counsel and the court, which can make it more difficult to assert the privilege when necessary. 

  • Privilege
    Legal Updates

    Risks of Waiving Privilege for Third Party Litigants When Producing Documents to the Government

    Waiver of privilege and particularly inadvertent waiver of privilege is always a concern in e-discovery when producing documents to an outside party. Not only may your current litigation be affected but waiver may also affect your client’s future litigations and other litigation teams that had no involvement with your production. This is a particularly serious concern when producing documents to the government, given the power dynamics involved.

  • Shifting Costs
    Legal Updates

    Shifting Costs for Responding to Subpoenas Under FRCP 45

    Generally speaking, the presumption is that third parties will bear at least some of the costs of complying with proper subpoenas. That said, Courts often expect that a requesting party will negotiate in good faith the costs of compliance and, if those costs are significant, the requesting party would agree to cover at least some of the costs or limit its requests in light of the requirement of FRCP 45(d)(2)(B)(ii). As demonstrated by a recent case, though FRCP 45 provides two avenues for a third party to recover its costs for responding to a subpoena in federal litigation, such awards are the exception to the rule.