E-Discovery Best Practices

  • Chicken
    Legal Updates

    A Game of Chicken? Setting Forth a Detailed TAR Review Protocol

    Last year, in In re Broiler Chicken Antitrust Litigation, the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois laid out a very detailed protocol for conducting TAR that can serve as a go-by for parties wishing to conduct TAR in their own litigation. If you are considering implementing TAR in your next review, you may want to take a look at this. 

  • On Legal Teams and E-Discovery Processing
    Technology Advantage

    On Legal Teams and E-Discovery Processing

    Given that data processing is a technical activity, how involved should legal teams be in this phase of discovery? In my opinion, case teams do not need to be experts about document processing tool mechanics (that’s what WE are for!). However, in my experience, legal teams that spend the effort to develop four specific skills end up with robust document databases, efficient reviewers and happy clients. 

  • Starling Underwood
    LitSmart News

    Quarterly Spotlight On..... Senior E-Discovery Attorney Starling Underwood

    This Quarterly Spotlight focuses on Starling Underwood, a Senior E-Discovery Attorney on Kilpatrick's LitSmart E-Discovery Team. Starling joined the firm two years ago and, in addition to his heavy case load, has taken active roles in numerous pro bono and community service projects. Aside from being an excellent lawyer, he is one of the nicest, most thoughtful people you'll ever meet. Scott O'Neal was fortunate to learn more about what makes Starling such a valuable team member and leader.

  • Data Collection: Remain Calm and Turn Over Your Phone
    Technology Advantage

    Data Collection: Remain Calm and Turn Over Your Phone

    Mobile devices are an absolute necessity in our everyday life. When it comes to litigation (or potential litigation), our beloved devices are usually subject to discovery as they may contain information that is relevant to proving or disproving a case. As a result, when developing a data collection strategy, mobile devices must be considered. Mobile devices may now be as valuable as the more typical sources of information, namely personal computers and network locations, and with this newly-recognized discovery relevance comes a potential for trouble.